The vexations of art
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The vexations of art Velázquez and others by Svetlana Alpers

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Published by Yale University Press in New Haven [Conn.] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Artists" studios,
  • Artists -- Psychology,
  • Painting, European -- Themes, motives

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. 263-292) and index.

StatementSvetlana Alpers.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsN8520 .A44 2005
The Physical Object
Paginationviii, 298 p. :
Number of Pages298
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL23240007M
ISBN 100300108257
LC Control Number2004023966

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The Vexations of Art book. Read 2 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Velázquez is often considered an artist apart: great, but isola 4/5.   "The Vexations of Art, is an engrossing, passionate attempt to re-engage with painting as a mode of thought at a time when 'it is not clear in what form the resource of painting—for surely painting has been a singular resource of the greater European culture—will continue."—Jackie Wullschlager, Financial Times. "The Vexations of Art is an engrossing, passionate attempt to re-engage with painting as a mode of thought at a time when 'it is not clear in what form the resource of painting—for surely painting has been a singular resource of the greater European culture—will continue."—Jackie Wullschlager, Financial TimesPrice: $ The Vexations centers on the life of the composer Erik Satie (), bringing to life Paris's Bohemian society of eccentric and cutting-edge artists. The novel also tells the story of Erik's siblings, separated as orphans after their mother's death. Conrad Satie leads a /5.

  “The Vexations” builds to a devastating conclusion, but it’s worth the pain for this unusual, quietly beautiful meditation on the work and strife behind art that has endured for generations. A major art historian reflects on a great tradition of European painting. " The Vexations of Art is an engrossing, passionate attempt to re-engage with painting as a mode of thought at a time when 'it is not clear in what form the resource of painting—for surely painting has been a singular resource of the greater European culture—will continue."—Jackie Wullschlager, Financial Times.   The illustrations to The Vexations of Art are a text in themselves - there are repeated images of the same paintings, differently juxtaposed, and in the case of Las Hilanderas with and without. "Genius blazes in this gorgeous and breathtakingly assured novel -- sometimes center-stage, sometimes in a corner -- but there are no satellites: seldom have I read a book about art that refuses so staunchly to treat any life as minor. The Vexations is a rare, engrossing, humane achievement."—.

  The Vexations explores grand themes with grace and conviction."— Hamilton Caine, Minneapolis Star Tribune "A beguiling debut As a title, The Vexations befits a novel about the uncompromising genius of a man who by the end of his life appears to have alienated everyone he cared about. However, if this makes it sound like Satie is Horrocks's unique focus that would be : Little, Brown and Company. Lauren Groff, National Book Award finalist and New York Times bestselling author of Fates and Furies and Florida "A finally wrought, sensitive novel about family and genius, and the toll that genius exacts on family in pursuit of great art."—The Millions "What a fabulous, original novel The Vexations is. Its unflinching honesty about an.   “The Vexations,” a debut by Caitlin Horrocks, places the avant-garde composer within the colorful world of fin-de-siècle Paris and at the center of a family drama. Sections SEARCH.   Although the standard edition of Bacon's works by Spedding, Ellis and Heath and the new Oxford edition by Graham Rees translate the phrase vexationes artium as the ‘vexations of art’, a significant number of scholars, translators and editors from the seventeenth century to the present have read Bacon's Latin as the ‘torment’ or ‘tortures of art’.Cited by: 6.